dandyism22:

historiful:


“Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”
-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930. 

DANDYISM………..Plate 292.

dandyism22:

historiful:

Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”

-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930. 

DANDYISM………..Plate 292.

ARTIST: Sneaker Pimps

TRACK: Half Life

ALBUM: Splinter (1999)

PLAYS: 93
ttransluciduss:

Transparent Death Head Moth
by Dagger

ttransluciduss:

Transparent Death Head Moth

by Dagger

"I have often wondered if Mr. Conservative/Libertarian turns down raises his company offers to *him.* Because I’ve only ever heard this argument applied to low-wage workers. Apparently, when you increase executive salaries and bonuses, that money comes out of a magical portal somewhere, so prices are unaffected. And no one ever tries to tell middle-class knowledge workers that getting a raise would only leave them worse off in the long run. It’s only ever the working poor. I guess they get paid with a different, more sinister kind of money."

Rebecca Wald, quoted in Mia Nutick - For those who are in discussions with people who believe that raising the minimum wage is bad for the people who get minimum wage, or bad for prices in general, I give you this quote which breaks it down *perfectly*: (via mslorelei)

mawoftriskaidekathon:

rhobi:

i was trying to find coffin references from 1920 and

image

I want ten.

freystupid:

from  Library of World Literature for Children

N.I. Maltsev, Russian illustrator

(Source: hideback)

defilerwyrm:

thegreenwolf:

xtori34:

Looking up Scottish mythological creatures and

Wulver: a werewolf in Shetland, that is said to have had the body of a man with a wolf’s head. It was reported to have left fish on the windowsills of poor families.

That is the nicest Werewolf legend I’ve ever heard of.

Now I wish I could draw because I’d love to draw this.

image

i tried

zazzle-poetry:

buy here

zazzle-poetry:

buy here

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Olive Wreath, 4th Century BC
A wreath made from wild olive branches, also known as kotinos, was the prize for the winner at the ancient Olympic Games. According to Pausanias, the sacred olive tree at Olympia, from which the champion’s wreaths were made, came from the land of the Hyporboreans. It was brought to Olympia by Herakles and planted near the temple dedicated to his father, Zeus, in his honor. Legend says that it was Iphitos who first used a crown of wild olive leaves from sacred tree, called the kallistephanos, to crown victors at the Olympic games.
Olive wreaths were also made for the champions of the Panathenaic Games in Athens. Mythology says that these wreaths were made from the sacred olive tree that grew from where Athena struck her spear on the ground at the Acropolis. For the ancient Greeks, the olive tree was a symbol of peace, wisdom and triumph.
Gold wreaths were made imitating  their natural counterparts in various forms, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities. Because of their fragility, gold wreaths were probably not meant to be worn very often, only during special functions. They were also dedicated to the gods in sanctuaries and placed in graves as funerary offerings for wealthy or important people. Though they were known in earlier periods, gold wreaths became much more popular in the Hellenistic age, probably due to the greatly increased availability of gold in the Greek world following the conquests of Alexander the Great.
Herodotus describes the following story which is relevant to the olive wreath. Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae. He inquired why there were so few Greek men defending the Thermopylae. The answer was “All other men are participating in the Olympic Games”. And when asked “What is the prize for the winner?”, “An olive-wreath” came the answer. Then Tigranes, one of his generals uttered: “Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for virtue.”

archaicwonder:

Greek Gold Olive Wreath, 4th Century BC

A wreath made from wild olive branches, also known as kotinos, was the prize for the winner at the ancient Olympic Games. According to Pausanias, the sacred olive tree at Olympia, from which the champion’s wreaths were made, came from the land of the Hyporboreans. It was brought to Olympia by Herakles and planted near the temple dedicated to his father, Zeus, in his honor. Legend says that it was Iphitos who first used a crown of wild olive leaves from sacred tree, called the kallistephanos, to crown victors at the Olympic games.

Olive wreaths were also made for the champions of the Panathenaic Games in Athens. Mythology says that these wreaths were made from the sacred olive tree that grew from where Athena struck her spear on the ground at the Acropolis. For the ancient Greeks, the olive tree was a symbol of peace, wisdom and triumph.

Gold wreaths were made imitating  their natural counterparts in various forms, including oak, olive, ivy, vine, laurel and myrtle. Most of these trees or plants have associations with various deities. Because of their fragility, gold wreaths were probably not meant to be worn very often, only during special functions. They were also dedicated to the gods in sanctuaries and placed in graves as funerary offerings for wealthy or important people. Though they were known in earlier periods, gold wreaths became much more popular in the Hellenistic age, probably due to the greatly increased availability of gold in the Greek world following the conquests of Alexander the Great.

Herodotus describes the following story which is relevant to the olive wreath. Xerxes was interrogating some Arcadians after the Battle of Thermopylae. He inquired why there were so few Greek men defending the Thermopylae. The answer was “All other men are participating in the Olympic Games”. And when asked “What is the prize for the winner?”, “An olive-wreath” came the answer. Then Tigranes, one of his generals uttered: “Good heavens! Mardonius, what kind of men are these against whom you have brought us to fight? Men who do not compete for possessions, but for virtue.”

(Source: indigoeyes278)

Ben Whishaw cast as lead in new BBC gay spy drama

giddytf2:

Would you look at that, a gay actor playing a gay character who’s the lead of the show that’s a BBC gay spy drama.

rimlit:

bathing 

rimlit:

bathing 

(Source: asmael-ascabel-eyniel)

(Source: alabina-life)

(Source: 19thcenturyboyfriend)

c-bedford:

While sleeping snakes lie.
Pencil work of Liam for waitkc, from my 666 Giveaway.
Bjork - Vertebrae by Vertebrae

c-bedford:

While sleeping snakes lie.

Pencil work of Liam for waitkc, from my 666 Giveaway.

Bjork - Vertebrae by Vertebrae